Tagged: Chad Cordero

This Week Had Highlights!

  • After missing him at Comiskey and Yankee Stadium, I finally got to see Esteban Loaiza pitch live at Shea on Wed., Sept. 14.  It was a long-awaited thrill, as readers of this blog will have inferred.  Yes, Mom, I skipped work.  Marc Marc came along, and we had fun being thrown-at by Met fans annoyed by our cheers for Loaiza and fellow ex-Yankee Nick Johnson — plastic cups, balled-up cellophane, etc.  In fact, there may have been more Yankee fans at Shea that night than Met fans.  You could hear them loud and clear. (Well, it was a $5 ticket night, and the Yanks were at Tampa Bay.)  OK, how can you tell a true Met fan?  S/he hates the Mets.  Those boos bearing down on their starter Kris Benson in the FIRST INNING were from his supporters.  With fans like that….  Back to baseball, I should mention that this very satisfying 6-3 win by the Nationals was framed by two unsettling errors on the part of their starting and closing pitchers.  Loaiza’s 7-inning start to his 11th win was marred by an un-recorded error when he neglected to cover first base and receive the ball from Johnson, who had left the bag to field.  It was strange — he just stood there, about halfway between the mound and first, just watching the batter run safely to the bag.  Johnson had nowhere to throw.  In the 9th, stellar closer Chad Cordero (ERA 1.84, with 46 saves, as of today) pointed hastily up to the sky to indicate that an infield popup needed catching.  When it started dropping down toward him, he looked a little panicked, and, as two players converged on him, the ball dropped to the ground amid the three.  He escaped unscathed, but, that was a bit unnerving.  The rest of the game was great in a classic way.  After the Nationals broke a first-inning 1-1 tie and pulled ahead 3-1 in the third, Loaiza lost the lead in the 4th when the Mets tied it up.  This got tense.  Having lost the advantage of some of his best run support this season, Loaiza looked likely to lose, but his teammates came back to score two more the next inning, and he was ahead 5-3 when he walked off the field in the 7th.  I was glad Frank Robinson hadn’t taken the ball from him — those moments always come across ugly.  I was hoping for a Mike Stanton sighting (3.81 lifetime, with 984 innings pitched as of yesterday) — the last time I saw him at Shea he was relieving David Cone in a Mets uniform.  But Gary Majewski (2.65), who is flourishing, came in, and came through, for the eighth, and I was so pleased to see Cordero — the Eric Gagne (hurt this year, so I omit his stats) of the NL East — close it out in the ninth.  Cordero trained as a closerat Cal State-Fullerton, sparing us his adjustment to the position.  I wonder how prevalent the collegiate development of relievers is….